My first Atom package: Angular-Bootstrap

For the past year I’ve been using Atom on a nearly daily basis. Despite its sluggishness it quickly became my editor of choice thanks to many packages that are improving my workflow. I’m often using AngularJS and the UI Bootstrap components for my projects, so I decided to write my own Atom package full of snippets and auto-completions for that exact (and obviously popular) combination of frameworks. It’s appropriately called Angular-Bootstrap and received 171 downloads by now! It’s far from done (many components and documentation are still missing) but seeing it being downloaded and used by other people clearly increases my motivation to maintain it over a longer time.

So – if you’re one of its users – thanks for using my package and don’t hesitate to leave feedback in the GitHub repo!

The Modal snippet/auto-completion.

A re-design.

Before and now.

Before and now.

That’s basically it!

And I’m also planning to open-source this new theme because I hand-crafted it carefully and I think it might be useful for other people/bloggers/WordPress users, too. I’m just doing some last adjustments and fixes right now, so it’ll probably appear online and hackable in a few weeks.

Update: The theme is now being developed on GitHub.

Awesome web-based tools.

What’s great nowadays is that you can basically run your pc as a thin client and do a lot of work and entertainment entirely web-based. You’ve probably already been doing it for a while with emails, documents (Google Drive or Office Web), music, games and more. Why not extend those use cases to more complex areas like graphics editing and music creation? Some tools are surprisingly feature-rich and fast-performing. Here are some examples:

  • Gravit, a design app for vector-based illustrations and more
  • Pixlr, a Photoshop-like editor
  • Tridiv, a CSS 3D editor that outputs 3D models as HTML and CSS
  • Audiotool, basically a complete DAW in your browser
  • smallpdf.com, a nice tool set for a lot of PDF actions (merging, splitting etc.)

Once again: All those tools are web-based which means they are easily accessible from anywhere while the results are stored in the cloud (but can also be downloaded and/or rendered for offline use). Most of them can be used for free as well and are based on Open Source code.

Of course there are downsides, too. Businesses and privacy-savvy people might criticize the idea of storing their data “cloud-first” and not every computer and browser might handle all the features and bigger data assets. Also there are many places where you cannot access the web at all.

However I’m excited for the future and the dawn of new possibilities, especially on the audio side of things (e.g. Web Audio and Web MIDI APIs).

If you know or find a cool web app yourself, please let me know!